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Bibliography Resources

BibMe
Find your source (for example, enter the 13 digit ISBN number from the back of a book) and it does the rest. Sign up is required if you want to save your work on the site.

Citation Maker
Very good, especially if you have a wide variety or unusual source formats (web pages, encyclopedia articles, etc.)

SourceAid
Sign up required, free service

Noodle Tools



Style, Formatting, and Samples

Bibliographic Styles: ECASD
University of Wisconsin Writing Center
Annotated Bibliography Guide




How Can I Tell if a Website is Reliable?
The Internet contains some extremely valuable, high-quality information sources – and it also contains some very unreliable, biased sources of misinformation.

1. Who authored (wrote) the site?
If no information about the author(s) of the page is provided, be suspicious.
- Does the author provide his/her credentials?
- What type of expertise does s/he have on the subject s/he is writing about? Does s/he indicate what his/her education is? - What type of experience s/he has? Should you trust his/her knowledge of the subject?

2. Who published the site?
The suffix is usually (but not always) descriptive of what type of entity hosts the website. Keep in mind that it is possible for sites to obtain suffixes that are misleading. Here are some examples:
 .edu = educational
 .com = commercial
 .mil = military
 .gov = government
 .org = nonprofit

3. What is the main purpose of the site? Why did the author write it and post?
 To sell a product?
 As a personal hobby?
 As a public service?
 To further scholarship on a topic?
 To provide general information on a topic?
 To persuade you of a particular point of view?

4. Who is the intended audience?
 Scholars or the general public?
 Which age group is it written for?
 Is it aimed at people from a particular geographic area?
 Is it aimed at members of a particular profession or with
 specific training?

5. What is the quality of information provided on the website?

 Timeliness: when was the website first published? Is it regularly updated? Check for dates at the bottom of each page on the site.
 Different publication dates will be acceptable depending on which type of information you’re looking for. If you’re looking for statistics, information on current events, or information in fields like science, technology or healthcare, you probably need the most up-to-date information available. If you’re looking for information that doesn’t change, such as Mark Twain’s date of birth or who led the Union Army in the Civil War, older sources will work.
 Does the author cite sources? Just as in print sources, web sources that cite their sources are considered more reliable. It shows that the author has done his/her homework and is familiar with scholarship in the field.

Marathon High School • 204 East Street • P.O. Box 37 • Marathon, WI 54448 • 715.443.2226 • Fax 715.443.2611
Marathon Area Elementary School • 100 Spring Valley Drive • P.O. Box 457 • Marathon, WI 54448 • 715.443.2538 • Fax 715.443.2230

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